Saturday, March 3, 2012

Cold Frames!

I came home the other day to find three beautiful cold frames that my husband had built for me. What a nice surprise! I love them. And I REALLY love my husband...


I've been saving old windows for a while now, but had forgotten these were in the cellar. They're the ones that were taken out of our 1928 farmhouse when the previous owner replaced them with vinyl framed windows.

The bases were made out of some salvage cedar 1" x 12" that we had. He measured the windows and the built the boxes to those dimensions. The backs were the full 1" x 12", the sides cut on an angle so that one end was 12" and tapered down to 10", and the fronts were cut down to 1" x 10". The 2" slope from front to back makes it easier for the rain to run off. (Side note: my husband, the carpenter, corrected me and said that the actual measurements for a 1" x 12" varied between 11" and 11.5". And he's telling this to a woman who eyeballs things for 'close enough' and whose measurements are generally so many inches and 'three little marks'...)

You can see here how he put them together. Very simple construction using some screws that we had here at the house. But you could use nails. And no bottoms. I may put some pea gravel in the bottoms later in the spring. Can't wait to fill them with my flats of planted veggie and flower seeds.


The windows were attached using some standard 3" hinges. I love things old and weathered so we are leaving them the way they are. It just makes me happy to see them all lined up.

Want to build your own? All you need to do is gather:
  • Old wood frame windows
  • Salvage wood 1 x 12. We used cedar, but any scrap wood would do.
  • Nails or screws
  • 2 metal hinges for  each frame
  • Hammer or screwdriver
  • Saw
Easy cheesy! Total cost for our project? $10 for the hinges! Now that's what I call "Making DO"!


19 comments:

  1. great cold frames, I am a big gardener, and love to start my seeds/plants and get a big head start! These frames are not only functional but very nice looking. thanks for showing us how! My fingers are crossed that you will share at Sunday's Best Par.tay going on now. Too cute not to share!

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    1. Thank you Cathy! Would love to share at the Sunday's Best Par.tay!

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  2. Love your cold frames! I've wanted to do this - can I borrow your husband for a couple of hours? :)I'm gonna pin this, too.
    New follower!
    -Revi

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    1. Thank you Revi! Hmmmmm.....wonder how the husband would take being loaned out??? LOL Thank you for pinning, and following! Working to get all the new pages up in the next few days. So much to share ;0)

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  3. Wanted to stop by and thank you for sharing on Sunday's Best Par.tay. I see you are a new blogger. Welcome! To showcase you cold frame and introduce you I have featured this on my Facebook page. I can't join you on GFC, since I am not on blogger. Look around everyone is changing to Linky (www.linkyfollowers.com). Just an FYI!

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    1. Thank you so much Cathy! Loved seeing your mention of me on your facebook page. I actually have had another blog for a while now. mywrensnest.blogspot.com But, life is changing and this is a blog I've wanted to do for a while. I'm excited to finally get it going and can't wait to add to it. Thank you too for the headsup on Linky. Added it to this blog and joined your group too. Looking forward to following you!

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  4. Um... yes. I'd like to put an order in for some of these for MY house? Yeah. Thanks. I'll be over to pick them up as soon as you tell me they are done. :)

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    1. LOL. I can't wait to plant in them. You've been to my house Rachel. I have piles of wonderful junk around here. I could probably make some of these for everyone in town.

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  5. Can you plant anything that will grow in the winter in these? I'm in Buffalo, NY~ Barb Becker

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    1. Hi Barb, I use mine more for starting seed and growing winter salad greens. We don't get very cold winters here so it seldom gets below freezing. I'm not sure what you could grow in them in your cold winters. It would be worth a try though!
      ~Wren

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  6. Replies
    1. Thank you Mike! Now if I could just figure out how to slug proof them....LOL

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    2. any concerns about lead paint on old windows?
      -Mrs. B

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  7. How long are each side of the frames? You just mention 1" by 12" but the 12" seems to be the height.

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  8. Would you remove the windows and leave the plants in there through the growing season. Great idea

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  9. my floors and stairs are carpeted and I would really like to try this..think it is possible to do on stairs? how do I prepare floors after removing carpet and before starting this process (of papering floors)?

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  10. DO you have a way to prop the windows open so you can ventilate the boxes? I thought cold frame tops are tilted to accommodate low winter sun.

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    Replies
    1. I just use a small block of wood to ventilate if needed. Very low tech here at Rosehaven!

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  11. Be carful of potential lead paint on old windows.

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